(To read the original post on PTLS click here. And then the next one is here.) Disclaimer: I am not a medical professional. This is not medical advice. I cannot give medical advice and don’t claim to have all the answers. I am simply a woman telling the story of her experience after tubal ligation. If you are considering having a tubal ligation, PLEASE do thorough research. Get your doctor to openly talk about what they’ve heard about post tubal menstral flow and what it does to hormones after the blood supply is cut off to the ovaries. In some women, this appears to cause major problems, including me. A part of me wishes no one had ever come up with a name for what can happen after a woman has a tubal ligation. (Post Tubal Ligation Syndrome, or PTLS.) Calling the symptoms anything that sounds medical makes doctors roll their eyes because [...]

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I have received more emails and comments about PTLS than anything else. By far. There are far too many women out there googling their symptoms and landing on my blog. I’m still not totally comfortable calling what I deal with PTLS. There’s so much mis-information about this. Most of the medical community scoffs at such a “syndrome” saying that it’s impossible and it’s all in our heads. They say that the idea that we’re struggling because of a tubal ligation is one that doctors who do reversals created to keep themselves in business. That’s interesting, because no one told me my symptoms could be related to my tubal. I didn’t google it. I just knew. It’s called intuition or a gut feeling and as invalid as that may seem to many medical professionals, it’s a reality. We know our bodies. We know when something is wrong and I knew for certain that something [...]

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Oh friends. I’m sitting here overwhelmed with gratitude for the way you’re taking your time to email me with your stories and/or your willingness for me to ask you some questions if you’ve had your tubes tied. (See part one about the aftermath of a tubal ligation.) Writing about this here has been so eye-opening, and that’s a complete understatement.  What I know for sure is that doctors a) don’t know enough about this and/or b) don’t take it seriously by way of blaming other possibilities for the symptoms. But I know, I just know, that there’s no way that it is a coincidence that this many women would be experiencing the same thing after having had their tubes tied. Many of you are asking what my symptoms are and yes, I’m willing to share. The only reason I didn’t in my first post is because I didn’t want to lead people to believe [...]

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(This post is quite different from my usual, but please hang in there with me because I would love your help. Thank you!) I was talking to a nurse on the phone, wondering if I should come in to see my OB/GYN, the one who I saw through my pregnancies and deliveries with both Asher and Elsie. The nurse said that what I was describing was “post tubal ligation syndrome”. This is not what I was expecting to hear even though I had been researching online and feeling more and more certain that my tubal ligation was to blame for how awful I’m feeling. Not long after Elsie was born, I had this heart-gut feeling that my increased anxiety and depression (and some other physical issues) were due to having had my tubes tied when I had my c-section. But even though I felt strongly that having a tubal has caused something, I didn’t understand what [...]

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